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Staffordshire Heritage Group and their Staffordshire flag proposal

Trevor Fisher (history writer and heritage group member), Phillip Kinnersley (Chair of Trustees for Stafford Burgesses Guild), Margaret George (Chair of Staffordshire Heritage Group), John Edwards (Master of Stafford Burgesses Guild) and Professor Alan Eardley (Squire of Stafford Morris Men). Photo: Josh Cope.
Trevor Fisher (history writer and heritage group member), Phillip Kinnersley (Chair of Trustees for Stafford Burgesses Guild), Margaret George (Chair of Staffordshire Heritage Group), John Edwards (Master of Stafford Burgesses Guild) and Professor Alan Eardley (Squire of Stafford Morris Men). Photo: Josh Cope.

3 thoughts on “Staffordshire Heritage Group and their Staffordshire flag proposal

  • I think it looks unbalanced. The knot should be centred and the colours counter-changed where it lies across the chevron and background. That will also slightly more distance it from the coat of arms of staffordshire County Council, which would be no bad thing, as the present county council does not administer the full historic or traditional county of Staffordshire. At present it looks like it is a “cropped” 2/3 of the county council’s arms.

  • Thanks for your suggestion. The design is based on a depiction that is several centuries old, taken from the John Speed map of 1611, which appeared in his atlas of Great Britain. In the late nineteenth century this design was used by the county council as the focal part of its seal and appears above the main entrance of Bridgewood House, Earl Street, Stafford built in 1896 and now student accommodation for nearby Stafford College. An extension on the back of this building was built in 1905 which again features the Chevron & Knot design. The council was formally awarded arms in 1931 which added a lion to the traditional county pattern, as a mark of its authority – so rather than the proposed flag distancing itself from the council coat of arms, the council coat of arms is actually derived from this design, which is much older. The Flag Institute accepted the submission of this design on the basis of its “traditional” status and long standing usage – any other variation, such as you describe, would only have been considered if there had been a flag competition. Additionally, the precise realisation of the Knot and Chevron design was created by the Staffordshire Heritage Group in consultation with the Flag Institute.

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